9.11.14

Susan Orlean

creative nonfiction writer

Talk on Craft

September 11, 3:00 p.m.

CSU Ostrander Auditorium

Reading

September 11, 7:30 p.m.

CSU 245

The bestselling author of Rin Tin Tin and The Orchid Thief, Susan Orlean has been called "a kind of latter-day Tocqueville" by The New York Times Book Review. One of her generation's most distinctive journalistic voices, Orlean is fascinated by American stories of every stripe. From Rin Tin Tin, the orphaned German shepherd who became a silent film star in the 1920's, to John Laroche, the convicted felon who slinks through the swamps of southern Florida looking for rare orchids, Orlean has an eye for the moving, the hilarious, and the surprising. A staff writer at the New Yorker for twenty years, she has also written for Outside, Esquire, Rolling Stone, Vogue, and The Boston Globe, and has edited both Best American Essays and Best American Travel Writing. Orlean's writing has inspired two films, including Adaptation, the Academy Award-winning film directed by Spike Jonze and starring Meryl Streep. She is currently working on The Library Book, an exploration of the history, power and future of the endangered institutions, told through the lens of her quest to solve the unsolved 1986 arson that nearly destroyed the Los Angeles Public Library. An engaging and unforgettable speaker, Orlean lectures on Rin Tin Tin, her encounters with extraordinary people, her experiences traveling the world, the value of ignorance, and women and the media.

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10.2.14

Matthew Dickman

poet

Daniel Alarcón

fiction writer

Talk on Craft

October 2, 3:00 p.m.

CSU Ostrander Auditorium

Reading

October 2, 7:30 p.m.

CSU 245

Matthew Dickman is the author of Mayakovsky’s Revolver and All-American Poem and the recipient of the Honickman First Book Prize, the May Sarton Award from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Kate Tufts Award from Claremont College, and the 2009 Oregon Book Award. He is co-author of the forthcoming 50 American Plays from Copper Canyon Press. He has also received residencies and fellowships from The Michener Center for Writers in Austin, Texas; The Vermont Studio Center; The Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown; and The Lannan Foundation. His poems have appeared in Tin House, McSweeney’s, Ploughshares, and the New Yorker, among others. He lives and works in Portland, Oregon where he is the poetry editor for Tin House magazine.

Daniel Alarcón is the author of the story collection War by Candlelight, a finalist for the 2005 PEN-Hemingway Award, and Lost City Radio, named a Best Novel of the Year by the San Francisco Chronicle and the Washington Post. His fiction, journalism and translations have appeared in A Public Space, El País, McSweeney’s, n+1, and Harper’s, and in 2010 The New Yorker included him on their list of the the best 20 writers under 40. Alarcón is co-founder of Radio Ambulante, a Spanish language storytelling podcast, and currently serves as a Fellow in the Investigative Reporting Program at the UC Berkeley School of Journalism. He lives in San Francisco, California.

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10.4.14

Good Thunder Presents

Ali Catt

Third Year MFA Candidate

Kit Arbuckle

First Year MFA Candidate

Michael Torres

Second Year MFA Candidate

Reading

October 4, 7:30 p.m.

St. Peter Art Center

Click here for more information on Good Thunder Presents

Ali Catt is an MFA student working on her thesis in creative nonfiction. In high school, she was voted "Most Likely to be on Jerry Springer,” a ship which has sadly sailed. She lives in Minneapolis with her dog Piggy and a couple cats who may or may not be plotting a mutiny.


Kit Arbuckle is a native of Williamsburg, Virginia who has strong maternal ties to Mississippi. She graduated from Elon University magna cum laude with a BA in English and a minor in theater. Currently in her first year of Minnesota State Mankato's MFA program, she aspires to become a professor of creative writing but wants to go to school for as long as possible first.

Michael Torres was born and raised in Pomona, California. His first chapbook of poetry, "The Beautiful Distraction" was published by Finishing Line Press. He received his BA in creative writing from the University of California, Riverside. He is currently an MFA candidate at Minnesota State University, Mankato, where he worries about the cold too often.

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10.30.14

NADINE B. ANDREAS VISITING WRITER RESIDENCY

Elizabeth Horneber

creative nonfiction writer and
2014-15 Andreas Graduate Assistant

Robert Hass

poet

Talk on Craft

October 30, 3:00 p.m.

CSU Ostrander Auditorium

Reading

October 30, 7:30 p.m.

CSU 245

Elizabeth Horneber is a third year creative writing MFA candidate from Rochester, New York. Her experiences teaching English in China have given fodder to her nonfiction essays, though she is also interested in a variety of subjects from philosophy to centipedes. She co-hosts the KMSU Weekly Reader radio program and is the creative nonfiction editor of the Blue Earth Review. Lately, she lives in an attic with a fish named Andronicus and without a bookshelf.

Robert Hass has published many books of poetry including Field Guide, Praise, Human Wishes, and Sun Under Wood, as well as a book of essays on poetry, Twentieth Century Pleasures. Hass translated many of the works of Nobel Prize-winning Polish poet, Czeslaw Milosz, and he edited Selected Poems: 1954-1986 by Tomas Tranströmer, The Essential Haiku: Versions of Basho, Buson, and Issa, and Poet's Choice: Poems for Everyday Life. He was the guest editor of the 2001 edition of Best American Poetry. His essay collection Now & Then, which includes his Washington Post articles, was published in April 2007. As US Poet Laureate (1995-1997), his deep commitment to environmental issues led him to found River of Words (ROW) , an organization that promotes environmental and arts education in affiliation with the Library of Congress Center for the Book. Hass is chairman of ROW’s board of directors, and judges their annual international environmental poetry and art contest for youth; he also wrote the introduction to the poetry collection River of Words: Young Poets and Artists on the Nature of Things. He is also a board member of International Rivers Network. Robert Hass was chosen as Educator of the Year by the North American Association on Environmental Education and, in 2005, elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. His collection of poems entitled Time and Materials won both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. He wrote the introduction to a new edition of selected Walt Whitman poems in Song of Myself: And Other Poems. His most recent volume of poetry is The Apple Trees at Olema: New and Selected Poems. He recently published a book of essays titled What Light Can Do: Essays on Art, Imagination, and the Natural World.


11.20.2014

Bonnie Jo Campbell

fiction writer

Talk on Craft

November 20, 3:00 p.m.

CSU Ostrander Auditorium

Reading

November 20, 7:30 p.m.

CSU 245

Bonnie Jo Campbell grew up on a small Michigan farm with her mother and four siblings in a house her grandfather Herlihy built in the shape of an H. She learned to castrate small pigs, milk Jersey cows, and, when she was snowed in with chocolate, butter, and vanilla, to make remarkable chocolate candy. Campbell's collection Women and Other Animals, won the AWP prize for short fiction, and details the lives of extraordinary females in rural and small town Michigan. Her story "The Smallest Man in the World" was awarded a Pushcart Prize. Her first novel, Q Road, delves into the lives of a rural community where development pressures are bringing unwelcome change in the character of the land. Her critically-acclaimed short fiction collection American Salvage was finalist for the National Book Award and the National Book Critic’s Circle Award. Her national bestselling novel Once Upon a River tells the story of a river odyssey with an unforgettable sixteen-year-old heroine, which the New York Times Book Review declares, is "an excellent American parable about the consequences of our favorite ideal, freedom."


1.29.2015

Traci Brimhall

poet

Ed Skoog

poet

Talk on Craft

January 29, 3:00 p.m.

CSU Ostrander Auditorium

Reading

January 29, 7:30 p.m.

CSU 245

Born in Little Falls, MN, Traci Brimhall is the author of Our Lady of the Ruins, selected by Carolyn Forché for the 2011 Barnard Women Poets Prize, and Rookery, winner of the 2009 Crab Orchard Series in Poetry First Book Award. Her poems have appeared Kenyon Review, Slate, The Believer, Ploughshares, New England Review, The New Yorker, and Best American Poetry 2013. She’s received fellowships from the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, the King/Chávez/Parks Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts. Born in Little Falls, MN, she’s currently an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at Kansas State University.

Ed Skoog was born in Topeka, Kansas in 1971. He is the author of two collections of poetry, Mister Skylight and Rough Day, both published by Copper Canyon Press. He has received fellowships from the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, Lannan Foundation, Richard Hugo House, and the Jenny McKean Moore Writer in Washington Fellowship at George Washington University. He has been a visiting assistant professor at the University of Montana. He coordinates the Idyllwild Summer Poetry Week, and co-hosts, with novelist J. Robert Lennon, the podcast Lunch Box, With Ed and John.


2.17-2.20.2015

EDDICE B. BARBER VISITING WRITER RESIDENCY

Natalie Diaz

poet

Danielle Sosin

fiction writer

Writing Workshop

Tuesday, February 17 -
Friday, February 20 10:00 a.m.

CSU 202 (Diaz)

CSU 203 (Sosin)

Talk on Craft

February 19, 3:00 p.m.

CSU Ostrander Auditorium

Reading

February 19, 7:30 p.m.

CSU 245

Natalie Diaz grew up in the Fort Mojave Indian Village in Needles, California, on the banks of the Colorado River. She is Mojave and an enrolled member of the Gila River Indian Community. After playing professional basketball in Europe and Asia for several years, she completed her MFA in poetry and fiction at Old Dominion University. She was awarded the Bread Loaf 2012 Louis Untermeyer Scholarship in Poetry, the 2012 Native Arts and Cultures Foundation Literature Fellowship, a 2012 Lannan Residency, as well as being awarded a 2012 Lannan Literary Fellowship. She won a Pushcart Prize in 2013. Her first book, When My Brother Was an Aztec, was published in June 2012 by Copper Canyon Press. She also teaches for the IAIA Low Residency MFA in Santa Fe. She currently lives in Mohave Valley, Arizona, and directs a language revitalization program at Fort Mojave, her home reservation. There she works and teaches with the last Elder speakers of the Mojave language.

Danielle Sosin is the author of The Long-Shining Waters, a novel from Milkweed Editions 2011. The Long-Shining Waters won the Milkweed National Fiction Prize, and was chosen as the One Book South Dakota 2013. The novel was a finalist for the Minnesota Book Award, as well as The Midwest Independent Bookseller’s Choice Award. Her first book was a collection of short stories, Garden Primitives, from Coffee House Press, 2000. Sosin has been the recipient of many awards and fellowships including the Minnesota State Arts Board, the Arrowhead Regional Arts Council, and the Loft Literary Center. She lives in Duluth, Minnesota.


3.19.2015

Chris Abani

fiction writer and poet

Talk on Craft

March 19, 3:00 p.m.

CSU Ostrander Auditorium

Reading

March 19, 7:30 p.m.

CSU 245

Chris Abani's prose includes Song For Night, The Virgin of Flames, Becoming Abigail, GraceLand, and Masters of the Board. His poetry collections are Sanctificum, There Are No Names for Red, Feed Me The Sun: Collected Long Poems, Hands Washing Water, Dog Woman, Daphne's Lot, and Kalakuta Republic. He holds a BA in English (Nigeria), an MA in Gender and Culture (Birkbeck College, University of London), an MA in English and a PhD in Literature and Creative Writing (University of Southern California). He is a Professor at Northwestern University and the recipient of the PEN USA Freedom-to-Write Award, the Prince Claus Award, a Lannan Literary Fellowship, a California Book Award, a Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, a PEN Beyond the Margins Award, the PEN Hemingway Book Prize, and a Guggenheim Award.


4.16.2015

ROBERT C. WRIGHT MINNESOTA WRITER RESIDENCY

Yer Thao

poet and 2014 Robert Wright Award winner

Sheila O'Connor

fiction writer

Talk on Craft

April 16, 3:00 p.m.

CSU Ostrander Auditorium

Reading

April 16, 7:30 p.m.

CSU 245

Yer Thao is an undergraduate student at MSU Mankato, with a Creative Writing major. She was born in Green Bay, WI but has been residing in Saint Paul, MN with her family for over ten years now. After she graduates, she plans to travel and teach English overseas for at least a year before continuing onto her graduate studies.

Sheila O'Connor is the award-winning author of four novels: Keeping Safe the Stars, Sparrow Road, Where No Gods Came and Tokens of Grace. Her poetry and fiction have been recognized with fellowships from the Bush Foundation, Loft McKnight and the Minnesota State Arts Board. A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, she is a professor in the MFA program at Hamline University, where she also serves as fiction editor for Water~Stone Review. O'Connor’s books have been honored with the Michigan Prize for Literary Fiction, Minnesota Book Award, International Reading Award, Midwest Booksellers Award, and Best Books of 2012 from VOYA, Bank Street Books, Booklist and Chicago Public Libraries.


4.30.2015

MSU MANKATO FACULTY RESIDENCY

Richard Robbins

poet

Richard Terrill

creative nonfiction writer and poet

Talk on Craft

April 30, 3:00 p.m.

CSU Ostrander Auditorium

Reading

April 30, 7:30 p.m.

CSU 245

Richard Robbins studied as an undergraduate at San Diego State University and as a graduate student at the University of Montana. He has published five books of poems: The Invisible Wedding (1984), Famous Persons We Have Known (2000), The Untested Hand (2008), Radioactive City (2009), and Other Americas (2010). Over the years, he’s received various awards and fellowships, including those from The Loft and the McKnight Foundation, The Minnesota State Arts Board, The Hawthornden Castle International Retreat for Writers, The National Endowment for the Arts, and The Poetry Society of America. He currently directs the creative writing program at Minnesota State University, Mankato.

Richard Terrill is the author of two collections of poems, Almost Dark and Coming Late to Rachmaninoff, winner of the Minnesota Book Award; as well as two books of creative nonfiction, Fakebook: Improvisations on a Journey Back to Jazz and Saturday Night in Baoding: A China Memoir, winner of the Associated Writing Programs Award for nonfiction. He has been awarded fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Wisconsin and Minnesota State Arts Boards, the Jerome Foundation, the MacDowell Colony, and the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. He has taught as a Fulbright professor in China, Korea, and Poland, and currently teaches creative nonfiction and poetry writing in the MFA program at Minnesota State University, Mankato, where he is a Distinguished Faculty Scholar. He works as a jazz saxophone player with the Larry McDonough Quartet. He lives in Minneapolis.