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Minnesota State University, Mankato
Minnesota State University, Mankato

Internships and Capstones

Page address: http://english.mnsu.edu/film/internships.html

Internships

Film and Media Studies Majors and Film Studies minors are eligible for the many internships offered by the film program.

1.  Internal Internships

The Film Studies Program offers a number of production internships throughout the academic year. In the past, students have interned at Mankato and Twin Cities companies and educational institutions who contact us directly with video production projects. One of the program's ongoing internships is with Maverick Video Productions (MVP) at Minnesota State University, Mankato. At MVP, students intern in media business and project management, production, and/or post-production/editing. Other internships are with B507 and the Water Resources Center at MSU, True Facade Pictures and Purple Porchlight Productions in Mankato, Visit Mankato, and KSMQ (Minnesota Public Television) in Austin. Students who have completed one or more production classes are eligible for these MSU, Mankato internships.

2.  External internships

Film internships open to all students attending a film program in the state of Minnesota include MN FilmTV and the Independent Filmmaker Project MN.

If you are interested in venturing outside of the state, check out Production Hub and Internships.com. Some of these are only open to recent graduates. 

 

Capstones for Film and Media Studies Majors: Film Concentration

As part of the degree program in Film and Media Studies at Minnesota State University, Mankato, students are required to complete a 2-credit capstone project.  This capstone project is usually conducted in the Summer, Fall or Spring semester of the student’s senior year before graduation. 

Capstone projects in Film can take on one of the following three forms:

1.  Writing and Analysis Project 

For this capstone project, students write a new paper in Film Studies on a topic of their choice. The topic must build upon and extend what they have learned in their critical studies classes in Film: in other words, the paper must reflect the student’s ability to perform original writing in Film History, Film Criticism, and/or Film Theory.  No part of this paper can be derived in any way from previous work: it must be a new project, written entirely during the semester in which the student is registered for the capstone.  The goal of this project will be to demonstrate in addition to conducting primary and/or secondary research as necessary (the type of research required will be determined in consultation with the advising professor).  

  • Paper length: 15-18 pages (250 words a page).
  • Written in consultation with an advising professor in Film Studies
  •  Regular meetings with advising professor (schedule determined by professor in consultation with students) on progress of study throughout the semester in which the capstone is taken 

This paper is presented as part of a final portfolio at the end of the capstone.  In addition to the new critical studies paper described above, the portfolio also includes the following:

  • Two revised papers from previous Film Studies classes.  Note: the choice of which paper to revise is made in consultation with professor at the beginning of the capstone
  • An updated CV/resume, which includes a list of all critical and creative projects relevant to the student’s post-graduation career plans, as well as a list of skills learned during internships in the program.

2.  Filmmaking Project 

For this capstone project, students create a new film (3-5 minutes approx.).  Ideas for the film are pitched to the advising professor during the first week of the capstone.  From there, the student writes a script, completes the pre-production process, and spends the majority of the semester shooting and editing the film.  Students working on a capstone project in Filmmaking are given access to the editing lab in Nelson 106 during off-hours to work on the project, as well as available film equipment in the Film Studies program (equipment also available for checkout in the library).  This new creative work must build upon and demonstrate what students have learned as filmmakers and creative artists during their classes in both filmmaking and film studies.

No part of this film can be derived in any way from previous work: it must be a new project, planned, written, shot, and edited entirely during the semester in which the student is registered for the capstone.  Students are not allowed to hire or in any way engage professional filmmakers in the making of their projects, although fellow students and peers may be enlisted as collaborators at the student’s discretion.  However, the student registered for the project must be the primary creative artist in the making of the film (i.e., the chief writer, director, editor of the film in question).

  • Film length: 3-5 minutes, approx..
  • Produced in consultation with an advising professor in Film Studies
  • Regular meetings with advising professor (schedule determined by professor in consultation with students) on progress of study throughout the semester in which the capstone is taken
  • The student completes a weekly blog entry which apprises the advising professor of all relevant progress on the project, and which also provides ongoing reflections on the student’s weekly growth as a filmmaker during the production process

This new film is presented as part of a final portfolio at the end of the capstone.  In addition to the new critical studies paper described above, the portfolio also includes the following:

  • An artist’s statement (5-6 pages, 1500 words ), in which the student reflects upon their growth in the Film and Media Studies program, and how this new film reflects their growth (see artist statement specs from FILM 416 – Film Theory and Criticism).
  • Two revised films from previous filmmaking classes. Note: the choice of which films to revise is made in consultation with professor at the beginning of the capstone.
  • An updated CV/resume, which includes a list of all critical and creative projects relevant to the student’s post-graduation career plans, as well as a list of skills learned during internships in the program

3.  Internship in Film 

For this capstone project, students work for one semester at an internship that gives them substantial, hands-on experience in a career field related to Film.  See your film advisor for internship assignments. The student is free to research internships on their own, but please keep in mind that all internships must be approved by one of the co-directors of the Film and Media Studies program before they may serve as capstone internships. 

The student has to work around 10-15 hours a week (2 credits). 

The student completes a weekly blog entry which details what specific work was done during that week on the internship.  Each weekly blog entry should also include a reflection on how the student is growing as a result of this hands-on work on the internship.

Internships must be secured and approved prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student wishes to complete the internship capstone. All Film Studies internships are assigned to students by advising professors.  All students planning on this option for their capstone should be registered for internship credit by the first week of classes. 

The internship also includes the following:

  • A final reflection paper (4-5 pages at 250 words a page), in which the student reflects upon their growth in the Film and Media Studies program, and how their semester-long work in the internship reflects their growth, and how it relates to future career plans.
  •  An updated CV/resume, which includes a list of all critical and creative projects relevant to the student’s post-graduation career plans, as well as a list of skills learned during internships in the program

Capstone Agreement 

In order to register for any capstone, you must:

  • Be a student in the senior year of your studies (including the summer term before graduation).
  •  Read the above information carefully and agree to these terms (by e-mail)
  •  Choose an advising professor for the capstone project.  Choice of professor may be contingent on faculty workload balance (i.e., even number of capstones assigned to professors across the program).
  • Choose which one of the three capstones you wish to complete, in consultation with advising professor
For more information about film capstones and internships, consult Prof. Donna Casella or Prof. Steve Rybin. If you are interested in a broad-based Media Studies capstone or internship, please contact Prof. Rachael Hanel.