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Minnesota State University, Mankato
Minnesota State University, Mankato

Courses & Current Schedule

Page address: http://english.mnsu.edu/film/filmschedule.html

For a complete list of film or media studies courses and descriptions, see the Undergraduate Bulletin. For information about topics classes, contact the instructor directly.

Course Schedule, Fall 2017
For Media Studies courses in the Film and Media Studies major, please see the Mass Media website.

Course Professor Meeting Information
FILM 110-01 (4 cr)
Film Appreciation
Amy Magnus Tues 6:00 - 9:45 pm
FILM 114-01 (4 cr)
Introduction to Film
Donna Casella Mon 6:00 - 9:45 pm
FILM114-02 (4 cr)
Introduction to Film
Donna Casella Tues/Thurs 4:00 - 5:45
FILM 210W-01 (4 cr)
Film Genres
Steve Rybin Tues/Thurs 12:00 - 1:45 pm
FILM 214-01 (4 cr)
Topics: Animation
Donna Casella Tues/Thurs 10:00 - 11:45 pm
FILM 217-01 (4 cr)
Introduction to  Film Production
Steven Rybin Mon/Wed 10:00 - 11:45 am
FILM 217-02 (4 cr)
Introduction to Film Production
Kurt Paulson Mon/Wed 4:00 - 5:45 pm
FILM 329 (4 c.)
Film History
Steve Rybin Mon/Wed 2:00 - 3:45 pm

 

Course Schedule, Spring 2017

 For Media Studies courses in the Film and Media Studies major, please see the Mass Media website.

Course Professor Meeting Information
FILM 110-01 (4 cr.)
Film Appreciation
Staff Wed 6:00 - 9:45 pm
FILM 114-01 (4 cr.)
Introduction to Film
Donna Casella Mon 6:00 - 9:45 pm
FILM 214-01 (4 cr.)
Topics: Star Studies
Steve Rybin Mon/Wed 2:00-3:45 pm
FILM 216W-01 (4 cr.)
Writing about Film
Donna Casella Mon/Wed 12:00 - 1:45 pm
FILM 317 (4 cr.)
Advanced Film
Production
Steven Rybin Tues/Thur 10:00 -11:45 am
FILM 334W-01 (4 cr.)
International Film
Steven Rybin Mon/Wed 10:00 -11:45 am
FILM 4/516 (4 cr.)
Film Theory
Donna Casella Tues/Thur 12:00-1:45 pm
     

Course Descriptions, Spring 2017

FILM 110 (4) Film Appreciation Staff
Promotes appreciation and understanding of cinema through the study of film style, film history, film genres, and the cultural impact of films. GE-6

FILM 114: Introduction to Film – Casella

In this course, students will study and analyze elements basic to a critical understanding of film: story; visual design; cinematography and color; editing and special effects; functions of sound and music; styles of acting and directing; and function of genre and social beliefs. Students will explore a mix of classic and contemporary films from the U.S. and around the world.Core Requirement: Film Studies Minor and Film and Media Studies Major. GE-6.

FILM 214: Topics in Film - Star Studies – Steve Rybin
This course introduces students to the close study of performance and stardom in the cinema. The class will consider the actor to be one of the most important creative contributions to film and the star to be a key aspect of our culture. Students will learn how to carefully consider the role of the actor in our experience of films as a narrative art form.  We will also consider stars as cultural constructs which carry important implications for how attitudes about gender, sexuality, and race are shaped and negotiated. Elective in Film Studies Minor and Film and Media Studies Major. GE-6.

FILM 216W: Writing About Film – Donna Casella

This course explores analytical film language/terminology in several different forms of film writing. Students will gain experience with short- and long-form reports/reviews, collaborative analysis, and formal critical essays. While concentrating on the mechanics and practice of writing in these forms, the course also emphasizes social and critical contexts in order to provide analytical skills that will support subsequent work in film studies. The subject of our study will include a mix of classic and contemporary films from the U.S. and around the world. Writing Intensive. Elective in Film Studies Minor and Film and Media Studies Major. GE-6.

FILM 317: Advanced Film Production – Steve Rybin

This course is designed to teach advanced principles of video production and post-production. It offers a mainly hands-on experience on creating professional looking films that, most importantly, tell a story. By taking this course you will learn how to work with high-end professional HD camcorders as well as DSLR cameras. You also will learn about the principle of lighting design, and master the conceptual and technical fundamentals of film editing. Elective in Film Studies Minor and Film and Media Studies Major.

FILM 334W: International Cinema -- Steve Rybin

This course introduces students to film from a variety of world cultures. It is designed to increase knowledge of world cultures and appreciation and understanding of cultural differences in representation. The course emphasizes history of national cinemas, film analysis, and writing. Elective in Film Studies Minor and Film and Media Studies Major. Writing Intensive. GE-6. GE-8. Purple.

FILM 416/516: Film Theory and Criticism – Donna Casella

This course will explore various theoretical perspectives on film including: Realism, Formalism, Neo-Realism, New Wave, Feminism, Genre, Ideology, and Post-Colonialism. Students will study the theories through readings and discussion and apply them to films throughout the course. Students also will write one critical paper applying a theory to a film and take two in-class exams on the theories. Students will study a mix of classic and contemporary films from the U.S. and around the world. Core Requirement in Film Studies Minor and Film and Media Studies Major.


Film Course Schedule, Fall 2016

For Media Studies courses in the Film and Media Studies Major, please go to the Mass Media website.

 

Course Professor Meeting Information
FILM 114-01 (4 cr)
Introduction to Film
Donna Casella Mon 6:00 - 9:45 pm
FILM114-02 (4 cr)
Introduction to Film
Steve Rybin Tues 6:00 - 9:45 pm
FILM 210W-01 (4 cr)
Film Genres
Donna Casella Tues/Thurs 12:00 - 1:45 pm
FILM 214-01 (4 cr)
Topics: Animation
Donna Casella Tues/Thurs 4:00 - 5:45 pm
FILM 217-01 (4 cr)
Introduction to  Film Production
Steven Rybin Mon/Wed 10 - 11:45 am
FILM 217-02 (4 cr)
Introduction to Film Production
Staff Mon/Wed 4:00 - 5:45 pm
FILM 329 (4 c.)
Film History
Steve Rybin Mon/Wed 2:00 - 3:45 pm
ENG 446
Screenwriting Workshop
Geoffrey Herbach Wed 6:00 - 9:45 pm
GER 460/560
Topics: German Cinema
Nadja Kramer Tues/Thur 12:00 - 1:50 pm

Course Descriptions, Fall 2016

FILM 114-01 4 cr (Donna Casella) Introduction to Film (M 6-9:45 pm)
In this course, students will study and analyze elements basic to a critical understanding of film: story; visual design; cinematography and color; editing and special effects; functions of sound and music; styles of acting and directing; and function of genre and social beliefs. Students will explore a mix of classic and contemporary films from the U.S. and around the world. Students will take three exams (multiple choice/true false) GE-6
 
FILM 114-02 4 cr (Steve Rybin) Introduction to Film (T 6-9:45 pm)
This course engages students in the study and analysis of the elements basic to a critical understanding of film: story elements; visual design; cinematography and color; editing and special effects; functions of sound and music; styles of acting and directing; and the function of genre and social beliefs.  GE-6
 
FILM 210W-01 4 cr (Donna Casella) Film Genres (T/Th 12-1:45 pm)
Students will explore a broad range of film genres including: hardboiled detective, police procedural, gangster, film noir, animation, science fiction, musical, western, war and screwball comedy. Course format includes lecture, readings (film genre text), viewings (genre films) and discussion. Students will take exams (multiple choice, short essay) and write and revise a film analysis paper. GE-1C, GE-6
 
FILM 214-01 4 cr (Donna Casella) Film Topics: Animation (T/TH 4-5:45 pm
Students will study the history and production of animation worldwide. Course format includes lecture, readings (animation articles), viewings (animation films) and discussion. Production areas explored include: cel animation, cut-out animation, CGI, stop motion animation, puppet animation and rotoscoping. The films studied include Akira, Chico and Rita, Waltz with Bashir, Metropia, Coraline, Toy Story and The Adventures of Prince Ahmed. Students will take two exams and prepare a web assignment on a director of their choice. GE-6
 
FILM 217-01 4 cr (Steve Rybin) Introduction to Film Production (M/W 10-11:45 am)
This course teaches the fundamental principles of video production. It offers both hands-on experience as well as a theoretical introduction to the creation of professional, well-composed images.  Students in this course learn how to work with cameras and how to edit video using the industry-standard software application Final Cut Pro X. GE 6 and 11
 
FILM 217-02 4 cr (Staff) Introduction to Film Production (M/W 4-5:45 pm)
This course teaches the fundamental principles of video production. It offers both hands-on experience as well as a theoretical introduction to the creation of professional, well-composed images.  Students in this course learn how to work with cameras and how to edit video using the industry-standard software application Final Cut Pro X. GE 6 and 11
 
FILM 329-01 4 cr (Steve Rybin) Film History (M/W 2-3:45 pm)
This course is designed to give students a foundation in film history. The course focuses on major directors, genres, and periods in film history with an emphasis on social, technological, and critical context in order to provide an analytical framework that will support subsequent work in film studies. This course is a pre-requisite for FILM 416 (Film Theory and Criticism) offered in the Spring.
 
ENG 446-01 4 cr (Geoff Herbach) Screenwriting Workshop (W 6-9:45 pm)
Introduces formal and structural elements of screenplay.  Examines both classical and minimalist storytelling.  Students produce original screenplays between 10 and 20 pages in length for workshop.
 
GER 460-01 4 cr (Nadja Kramer) Topics: German Cinema (T/Th 12-1:50 pm)
The “city” has been a character in film from the beginning of film-making and the city of Berlin has been decidedly shaping European and Western culture and history in the 20th century.  This course will look at the changing images of Berlin, starting with a few examples of new artistic expressions during the Weimar Republic and political terror during the Nazi dictatorship, and then focus on films at the frontline of the Cold War and the forced division through the Berlin Wall and its radically different political and economic ideologies. The course will begin with an introduction to film analysis, which pays special attention to the relationship between film and city. We will continue to discuss influential productions from the East and the West, go on to unified Germany and draw comparisons to other German city films.
 
 

Course Schedule, Spring 2016

 

Course Professor Meeting Information
FILM 114-01 (4 cr.)
Introduction to Film
Staff Mon 6:00 - 9:45 pm
FILM 110-01 (4 cr.)
Film Appreciation
Staff (closed) Wed 6:00 - 9:45 pm
FILM 214-01 (4 cr.)
Topics: Science Fiction Films
Donna Casella Mon/Wed 2:00-3:45 pm
FILM 216W-01 (4 cr.)
Writing about Film
Donna Casella Mon/Wed 10:00-11:45 am
FILM 317 (4 cr.)
Advanced Film
Production
Steven Rybin Tues/Thur 10:00 -11:45 am
FILM 334W-01 (4 cr.)
International Film
Steven Rybin Mon/Wed 12:00 pm-1:45 pm
FILM 4/516 (4 cr.)
Film Theory
Donna Casella Tues/Thur 12:00-1:45 pm
PHIL 465 (3 cr)
Philosophy of Film
**See Below
Brandon Cooke Tues/Thur 1:00-2:15 p.m.


Course Descriptions, Spring 2016

FILM 110 (4) Film Appreciation Staff
Promotes appreciation and understanding of cinema through the study of film style, film history, film genres, and the cultural impact of films. GE-6

FILM 114: Introduction to Film – Staff

Study and analysis of the elements basic to a critical understanding of film: story elements; visual design; cinematography and color; editing and special effects; functions of sound and music; styles of acting and directing; and function of genre and social beliefs. Core Requirement: Film Studies Minor and Film and Media Studies Major. GE-6.

FILM 214: Topics in Film - Science Fiction Films – Donna Casella

The course will study the history and practice of science fiction films from around the world. Science fiction themes will include: worlds out there; social, biological and environmental struggles; and science and technology. We will take two exams (lecture, readings and discussion) and do a web assignment on a science fiction director. Elective in Film Studies Minor and Film and Media Studies Major. GE-6.

FILM 216W: Writing About Film – Donna Casella

This course explores analytical film language/terminology in several different forms of film writing. Students will gain experience with short- and long-form reports/reviews, collaborative analysis, and formal critical essays. While concentrating on the mechanics and practice of writing in these forms, the course also emphasizes social and critical contexts in order to provide analytical skills that will support subsequent work in film studies. The subject of our study will include a mix of classic and contemporary films from the U.S. and around the world. Writing Intensive. Elective in Film Studies Minor and Film and Media Studies Major. GE-6.

FILM 317: Advanced Film Production – Steve Rybin

This course is designed to teach advanced principles of video production and post-production. It offers a mainly hands-on experience on creating professional looking films that, most importantly, tell a story. By taking this course you will learn how to work with high-end professional HD camcorders as well as DSLR cameras. You also will learn about the principle of lighting design, and master the conceptual and technical fundamentals of film editing. Elective in Film Studies Minor and Film and Media Studies Major.

FILM 334W:  International Cinema -- Steve Rybin
Introduces students to film from a variety of world cultures. Designed to increase knowledge of world cultures and appreciation and understanding of cultural differences in representation. Emphasizes history of national cinemas, film analysis, and writing. Elective in Film Studies Minor and Film and Media Studies Major. Writing Intensive. GE-6. GE-8. Purple.

FILM 416/516: Film Theory and Criticism – Donna Casella

This course will explore various theoretical perspectives on film including: Realism, Formalism, Neo-Realism, New Wave, Feminism, Genre, Ideology, and Post-Colonialism. Students will study the theories through readings and discussion and apply them to films throughout the course. Students also will write one critical paper applying a theory to a film and take two in-class exams on the theories. Students will study a mix of classic and contemporary films from the U.S. and around the world. Core Requirement in Film Studies Minor and Film and Media Studies Major.

PHIL 465:  Philosophy of Film -- Brandon Cooke
This course investigates some of the central philosophical issues in our thinking about film, including questions about narrative, ontology, ethical criticism of film, the role of artistic intentions in interpretation, artistic medium, and the art/entertainment distinction. Please Note:  This course is only 4 credits; Film Studies Majors and Film and Media Studies Minors but take an additional 1 credit of Philosophy Independent Study along with the course to receive full elective credit.

Course Schedule, Fall 2015

 

Course Professor Meeting Information
FILM 114-01
Introduction to Film
Richard Terrill Mon 6:00pm-9:45 pm
FILM 114-02
Introduction to Film
Steven Rybin Tue 6:00pm-9:45 pm
FILM 210W-01
Film Genres
Donna Casella Tue/Thur 12:00pm-1:45 pm
FILM 214-01
Topics in Film:  Horror
Donna Casella Tue/Thur 4:00-5:45 pm
FILM 217-01
Introduction to Film
Production
Steven Rybin Mon/Wed 10:00am-11:45 pm
FILM 329-01
Film History
Steven Rybin Mon/Wed 2:00pm-3:45 pm
ENG 446-01 
Screenwriting Workshop
Geoff Herbach Wed 6:00pm-9:45pm

Course Descriptions, Fall 2015

FILM 114-01 4 cr (Richard Terrill) Introduction to Film
Study and analysis of the elements basic to a critical understanding of film: story elements; visual design; cinematography and color; editing and special effects; functions of sound and music; styles of acting and directing; and function of genre and social beliefs. GE-6
 
FILM 114-02 4 cr (Steve Rybin) Introduction to Film 
Study and analysis of the elements basic to a critical understanding of film: story elements; visual design; cinematography and color; editing and special effects; functions of sound and music; styles of acting and directing; and function of genre and social beliefs. GE-6 

 FILM 210W-01 4 cr (Donna Casella) Film Genres 
Students will explore a broad range of film genres including: hardboiled detective, police procedural, gangster, film noir, animation, science fiction, musical, western, war and screwball comedy. Course format includes lecture, readings (film genre text), viewings (genre films) and discussion. Films studied include: The Maltese Falcon, Insomnia, In Bruges, Castle in the Sky, Open Range, Blade Runner, Three Kings, The Full Monty and Bella Martha. Students will take two essay exams and write and revise a film analysis paper. GE-1C, GE-6
 
FILM 214-01 4 cr (Donna Casella) Topics in Film:  Horror
The course explores the evolution of the horror genre in film with an emphasis on the following horror categories: vampire/ zombie/werewolf, supernatural, psychological, stalker/slasher, and revolt of nature. We will also cover hybrids like science fiction/horror. Students will take two exams (multiple choice and short essay) and complete a web assignment on a horror director of their choice. GE-6
 
FILM 217-01 4 cr (Steve Rybin) Introduction to Film Production 
This course teaches the fundamental principles of video production. It offers hands-on experience and a theoretical introduction to how to create professional, well-composed images. Students in this course learn how to work with HD camcorders and how to edit video using the industry-standard software application Final Cut Pro X. GE-6, GE-11
 
FILM 329-01 4 cr (Rybin) Film History
The course is designed to give students a foundation in lm history. The course
focuses on major directors, genres, and periods in lm history with an emphasis
on social technological and critical context in order to provide an analytical
framework that will support subsequent work.
 
ENG 446-01 4 cr (Geoff Herbach) Screenwriting Workshop 
Introduces formal and structural elements of screenplay.  Examines both classical and minimalist storytelling.  Students produce original screenplays between 10 and 30 minutes in length for workshop.


Spring 2014

Please Note:  Our film courses are still housed in the English department, but have their own FILM designator. Look for these courses in the Class Schedule and in the 2013-2014 Course Bulletin (forthcoming) under FILM. 

These courses fulfill the same General Education competencies and requirements in the Film Studies Minor as they did when they were listed under English.
 

 
Course Professor Meeting Information
FILM 110-01
Film Appreciation
Ashkan Soltani Wed 6:00pm-9:45pm
FILM 114-01
Introduction to Film
Donna Casella Mon 6:00pm-9:45 pm
FILM 114-02
Introduction to Film
Richard Terrill Tue 6:00pm-9:45pm
FILM 214-01
Topic: Film and Rock 'n' Roll
Ashkan Soltani Tue/Thur 4:00pm-5:45pm
FILM 216W-01 
Writing About Film
Donna Casella Mon/Wed 10:00am-11:45am
FILM 317-01 
Advanced Film Production
Ashkan Soltani Tue/Thur 10:00am-11:45am
FILM 4/516-01 
Film Theory and Criticism
Donna Casella Tue/Thur 12:00pm-1:45pm

Course Descriptions for Spring 2014

FILM 110-01 4 cr (Ashkan Soltani) Film Appreciation (W 6:00pm-9:45pm)
The purpose of this course is to inform and excite you about the art of cinema. We will try to outline, explain, and draw connection among artistic, technological, socioeconomic forces, which have shaped and reflected in the world of cinema. We will concentrate on important films and directors from around the world in order to comprehend their contribution to the evolution of film form and content. GE-6
 
FILM 114-01 4 cr (Donna Casella) Introduction to Film (M 6:00pm-9:45pm)
In this course, students will study and analyze elements basic to a critical understanding of film: story; visual design; cinematography and color; editing and special effects; functions of sound and music; styles of acting and directing; and function of genre and social beliefs. Students will explore a mix of classic and contemporary films from the U.S. and around the world. Students will take two exams (part multiple choice, part short answer) GE-6
 
FILM 114-02 4 cr (Richard Terrill) Introduction to Film (T 6:00pm-9:45pm)
Study and analysis of the elements basic to a critical understanding of film: story elements; visual design; cinematography and color; editing and special effects; functions of sound and music; styles of acting and directing; and function of genre and social beliefs. GE-6
 
FILM 214-01 4 cr (Ashkan Soltani) Topic: Film and Rock 'n' Roll (TH 4:00pm-5:45pm)
This course traces Rock & Roll film's growth as an art form, an industrial commodity, and a socio-historical product. We will consider features made in the United States and Europe, which like rock and roll itself first appeared in the mid-1950s. GE-6
 
FILM 216W-01 4 cr (Donna Casella) Writing About Film (MW 10:00am-11:45am)
This course explores analytical film language/terminology in several different forms of film writing. Students will gain experience with short- and long-form reports/reviews, collaborative analysis, and formal critical essays. While concentrating on the mechanics and practice of writing in these forms, the course also emphasizes social and critical contexts in order to provide analytical skills that will support subsequent work in film studies. The subject of our study will include a mix of classic and contemporary films from the U.S. and around the world. GE-6. Writing Intensive (WIGR)
 
FILM 317-01 4 cr (Ashkan Soltani) Advanced Film Production (TH 10:00 a.m.-11:45)
This course is designed to teach advanced principles of video production and post-production. It offers a mainly hands-on experience on creating professional looking films that, most importantly, tell a story. By taking this course you will learn how to work with high-end professional HD camcorders as well as DSLR cameras. You also will learn about the principle of lighting design, and master the conceptual and technical fundamentals of film editing. 
 
4/516-01 4 cr (Donna Casella) Film Theory and Criticism (Tue/Thur 12:00pm-1:45pm)
This course will explore various theoretical perspectives on film including: Realism, Formalism, Neo-Realism, New Wave, Feminism, Genre, Ideology, and Post-Colonialism. Students will study the theories through readings and discussion and apply them to films throughout the course. Students also will write one critical paper applying a theory to a film and take two in-class exams on the theories. Students will study a mix of classic and contemporary films from the U.S. and around the world.
 

Fall 2013

 

Course Professor Meeting Information
FILM 110-01
Film Appreciation
Ashkan Soltani Mon 6:00pm-9:45pm
FILM 114-01
Introduction to Film
Donna Casella Mon 6:00pm-9:45 pm
FILM 114-02
Introduction to Film
Richard Terrill Tue 6:00pm-9:45pm
FILM 210W-01
Film Genres
Donna Casella Tue/Thur 12:00pm-1:45pm
FILM 214-01
Topic: Animation
Donna Casella Tue/Thur 4:00pm-5:45pm
FILM 217-01 
Introduction to Film Production
Ashkan Soltani Mon/Wed 10:00am-11:45am
FILM 329-01 
Film History
Donald Larsson Mon/Wed 2:00pm-3:45pm
FILM 334W-01 
International Cinema
Ashkan Soltani Tue/Thur 10:00am-11:45am
FILM 446-01 
Screenwriting Workshop
Geoff Herbach Wed 6:00pm-9:45pm

Course Descriptions for Fall 2013

FILM 110 (4)  Film Appreciation
Promotes appreciation and understanding of cinema through the study of film style, film history, film genres, and the cultural impact of films. GE-6
 
FILM 114-01 4 cr (Ashkan Soltani) Introduction to Film (M 6:00 pm - 9:45 pm)
Study and analysis of the elements basic to a critical understanding of film: story elements; visual design; cinematography and color; editing and special effects; functions of sound and music; styles of acting and directing; and function of genre and social beliefs. GE-6 
 
FILM 114-02 4 cr (Richard Terrill) Introduction to Film (T 6:00 pm - 9:45 pm)
Study and analysis of the elements basic to a critical understanding of film: story elements; visual design; cinematography and color; editing and special effects; functions of sound and music; styles of acting and directing; and function of genre and social beliefs. GE-6
 
FILM 210W-01 4 cr (Donna Casella) Film Genres (T/Th 12-1:45 p.m.)
Students will explore a broad range of film genres including: hardboiled detective, police procedural, gangster, film noir, animation, science fiction, musical, western, war and screwball comedy. Course format includes lecture, readings (film genre text), viewings (genre films) and discussion. Films studied include: The Maltese Falcon, Insomnia, In Bruges, Castle in the Sky, Open Range, Blade Runner, Three Kings, The Full Monty and Bella Martha. Students will take two essay exams and write and revise a film analysis paper. GE-1C, GE-6
 
FILM 214-01 4 cr (Donna Casella) Film Topics: Animation (T/TH 4:00pm-5:45pm
Students will study the history and production of animation worldwide. Course format includes lecture, readings (animation articles), viewings (animation films) and discussion. Production areas explored include: cel animation, cut-out animation, CGI, stop motion animation, puppet animation and rotoscoping. The films studied include Castle in the Sky, Akira, Chico and Rita, Eleonor's Secret, Waltz with Bashir, Metropia, Coraline, Toy Story and The Adventures of Prince Ahmed. Students will take two exams and write and revise a short film analysis paper. GE-6
 
FILM 217-01 4 cr (Ashkan Soltani) Introduction to Film Production (M/W 10:00 am - 11:45 pm)
This course teaches the fundamental principles of video production. It offers hands-on experience and a theoretical introduction to how to create professional, well-composed images. Students in this course learn how to work with HD camcorders and how to edit video using the industry-standard software application Final Cut Pro X. GE-6, GE-11
 
FILM 329-01 4 cr (Donald Larsson) Film History (M/W 2:00 pm - 3:45 pm)
“Film” seems like a contradiction in terms.  “Moving pictures” are actually series of still images (even in digital formats). Such movies cue viewers to create fictional worlds and stories through sometimes huge technological infrastructures of machinery controlling light and sound. Films are products of a gigantic industry, but they also can be intimate artistic expressions. How did the movies begin nearly 120 years ago? What forces shaped their growth and development over the 20th century?  What is happening to “the movies” in the 21stcentury? This course provides contexts—technological, social, political, economic and artistic—for students to understand and analyze how and why individual films and film movements have reflected or resisted or stood apart from their times and our own. Students will view films outside of class, take several quizzes and a written midterm exam, and write short reaction papers and one longer analytic paper. No previous experience with film study is required. The required textbook for the class is A Short History of the Movies, 11th edition (Abridged Edition) by Gerald Mast & Bruce F. Kawin, Longman/Pearson Education, 2011 (ISBN 978-0205210626); list price new: $82.80; also available on Kindle. 
 
FILM 334W-01 4 cr (Ashkan Soltani) International Cinema (T/Th 10:00 am - 11:45 pm)
Introduces students to film from a variety of world cultures. Designed to increase knowledge of world cultures and appreciation and understanding of cultural differences in representation. Emphasizes history of national cinemas, film analysis, and writing. GE-1C, GE-6, GE-8, Purple
 
ENG 446-01 4 cr (Geoffrey Herbach) Screenwriting Workshop (W 6:00 pm-9:45 pm)
Introduces formal and structural elements of screenplay.  Examines both classical and minimalist storytelling.  Students produce original screenplays between 10 and 30 minutes in length for workshop.